Oct 162009
 

My father Dr. Khursheed N. Jeejeebhoy “retired” a few years ago; his last grant for research at the University of Toronto had run its course, and, after 40 years of filling in tedious grant applications, he felt it was time to say no more. Yet his expertise is still in demand, mostly around the world. I still am amused when thinking of the story of Canadian doctors heading down to the big hospitals in the US looking for expert help on TPN and receiving puzzled looks as the Americans said to them you have the TPN big guy in your own backyard, what’re you doing down here? Why the University of Toronto and every hospital in Toronto aren’t picking his brains and demanding he teach residents in TPN and nutrition is beyond me (one group of residents were even forbidden from going over to St Mike’s to learn from him), but it’s heartening to see the Toronto Star know who to turn to when looking for an answer to the question of how a terrorist on a hunger strike will fare. Is Mohamed Mahjoub technically starving himself as his doctor claims? Jeejeebhoy answers:

Starvation occurs when the body can no longer protect the brain and heart from malnutrition, he said.

Our body is designed so that other body parts, especially fat stores and the skeletal muscles, give themselves up to keep the brain and heart fed. The fat stores go first, Jeejeebhoy said, as your body converts these into carbohydrates to sustain life. Then the muscles are tapped as an energy source. (Joseph Hall, The Toronto Star, 16 October 2009)

To read the rest of his answer on Mahjoub’s hunger strike, check out the Second Opinion article in the GTA section.

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  • Mr. Mahjoub is not a terrorist. I challenge you to educate yourself about his Canadian-made nightmare by listening to this Rabble podcast about the unjust security certificate process in Canada. LINK.

    As for The Toronto Star’s and your determination that Mr Mahjoub’s hunger strike is somehow diminished or somehow less worthy of our compassion and our attention because he may not die from it, well, it’s hard to know how to respond in a civil manner to such a hateful, cold-blooded observation. Check out the Podcast. And try, if you dare, to imagine yourself in Mahjoub’s shoes.

    Brian O’Connor
    Webmaster, Justice for Mohamed Harkat Website

  • Mr. Mahjoub is not a terrorist. I challenge you to educate yourself about his Canadian-made nightmare by listening to this Rabble podcast about the unjust security certificate process in Canada. LINK.

    As for The Toronto Star’s and your determination that Mr Mahjoub’s hunger strike is somehow diminished or somehow less worthy of our compassion and our attention because he may not die from it, well, it’s hard to know how to respond in a civil manner to such a hateful, cold-blooded observation. Check out the Podcast. And try, if you dare, to imagine yourself in Mahjoub’s shoes.

    Brian O’Connor
    Webmaster, Justice for Mohamed Harkat Website

  • Shireen

    People really can’t read, can they. I challenge you to take your anger out of your head and read the post. I know all about the security certificates, but this post’s point had absolutely nothing to do with that issue. It was strictly on nutrition and whether it was starvation or malnourishment. And quite frankly, it was even more specific, it was about alerting my readership to my father being quoted in the paper. Tough shit if you don’t like that.

    As for feeling compassion for the man, well, your personal diatribe just sunk that. You want to advocate for Mr Mahjoub, you’re doing a piss poor job of it. You had an opportunity to add to this discussion by highlighting his living conditions and the reason for his hunger strike; instead you chose to attack me personally based on your poor rage-filled reading of a post. That’s going to get you nowhere. No wonder the poor guy is still at the government’s mercy with advocates like you in his corner.

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