Brain Biofeedback

Gamma Brain Biofeedback: A Rejig

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After I discussed my recent results with them, the ADD Centre has changed up my training. As my trainer put it, after seeing how I did after the first couple of screens: you do better if we’re not nice. (Well, everyone at the Centre has always been exceptionally nice to me, but I knew what she meant!) Making things easy for me cognitively speaking never works well. Not in school, not in biofeedback training either apparently. But boy did I need a nap afterwards!

Instead of a 30-second assessment, we’ll now do three minutes. It is harder but provides a reliable data set in addition to seeing the true state of my baseline (instead of just a small snapshot).

Then instead of doing two three-minute HRV or Heart Rate Variability screens, one with eyes closed, I’ll now do ten minutes, eyes open, so that I can follow the breathing prompt set at 5.7 breaths per minute (seems to be my optimum rate to increase gamma power). It is harder to deep breathe continuously for ten minutes than doing two three-minute sessions with a break in between. But at about the five minute mark, I began to relax. And at almost the eight minute mark, my mind opened up and my vision sharpened. So tis worth it.

We began gamma brainwave training with the bowling screen. I asked her to increase the muscle tension (EMG) difficulty by decreasing the max threshold for EMG, over which the bowling ball would stop moving (if I exceeded it). I wanted to drive my muscle tension down and couldn't do that with a too-easy max threshold.

After the bowling screen, we added another new thing. We did that because we're concerned that my recent increased stress (like I didn’t have enough before) is affecting the results. And so they want to see if introducing a stress-relieving activity will improve my gamma wave results. They know it will reduce muscle tension and theta waves. We followed that with one more brain biofeedback screen, the plane, and finished up with four minutes of HRV. To my trainer’s surprise, the new activity not only dropped theta waves and EMG but also my heart rate, which was again high today — one would think I had drunk an entire pot of coffee. But it didn't increase my gamma brainwaves, both during the activity or in the plane screen afterwards. It's early days yet though. We need to do this a few times before knowing for sure one way or the other.

I am to do the stress-busting activity every day for about a half-hour a day. I need to find a notebook to do that. I must have a spare one floating around my place or maybe I’ll use my iPad…

Oh, and the name of this activity is — SMIRB!

Huh?

Stop My Irritating Ruminations Book. More on this simple stress-releasing method in another post when I learn it properly, but the Drs. Thompson describe it in their chapter in Principles and Practice of Stress Management, Third Edition.

The results (EC=eyes closed; unless specified, HRV screens done with eyes open):

Date Baseline HRV EC HRV Fdbk 1 Fdbk 2 Fdbk 3 HRV
27 Jun 0.83 0.88 0.90 0.90 0.91
4 Jul 0.85 30s 0.90 0.91 0.94 0.898 0.90 0.84 EC
10 Jul 0.85 30s 0.92 0.89 0.86 0.84 0.86 0.90 EC
17 Jul 0.91 30s 0.97 1.05 1 0.94 0.96 0.97 EC
25 Jul 0.96 30s 1 1.03 1.02 1.01 0.97 1.02 EC
3 min 10 min Fdbk 1 SMIRB Fdbk 3 HRV
7 Aug 0.85 0.949 0.95 0.89 0.93 0.92

 

Brain Biofeedback

Gamma Brainwave Biofeedback: A Writing Day

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I don't know what to make of today’s gamma brainwave biofeedback results. To say they were up and down is a bit of an understatement. I'm going to have to discuss this with the ADD Centre head person on gamma.

The good news is the writing section went well. After the usual HRV screens and two neurofeedback screens (easy bowling one first, harder racing sailboats second), my trainer had me write something original for seven minutes.

I had spent the previous 24 hours cudgelling my brains to think of something short to write. I haven't been able to write a short story since my brain injury. This wasn't going to be a short story per se, but I wanted to write a totally original piece not riff off of something I'd written before or something nonfiction or a fan fic piece.

Finally! Just before I left home, the last line came to me. By the time I got there, I knew what to write and was impatient to begin. But once I was hooked up to the computer, I had mixed feelings. I wanted to get writing but I was also thankful for the usual routine.

My writing biofeedback results were the best of all the screens. And interestingly they demonstrated the difference between revising and writing a first draft. When I write a first draft, I put fingers to keys and rarely stop till done. Revising is a lot of reading with a burst of typing here and there. Needless to say my muscle tension was double during writing than revising. Because there's more creativity, my alpha was higher. But best of all, my gamma shot up. I was thinking, really thinking, thinking faster than my fingers can fly over the keys. I was also creating ideas — firming up those I’d already thought of and totally new ones coming from I don't know where — and creation and thinking had to meet up before my fingers knew what to do. It showed in my gamma brainwave power.

My trainer also noticed that, unlike yesterday, I couldn't care less what she was doing. And it was true. A peripheral part of me noted when she moved. But soon after I began writing, I didn't know if she was sitting next to me (or not) and didn't care, for I was totally into writing the piece in my head. My heart rate monitor wire did get in the way until I moved it round to the other side of my thumb (monitor was on my left thumb). My heart rate rose. But within normal range. Ditto for my breathing. (Breathing is one breath per minute faster when I write than revise.)

I did one last three-minute neurofeedback screen, a calming one, before calling it quits. It felt like I hit a wall; somehow I finished the screen. But the results were way down. My EMG or muscle tension was quite high on the first and last screens of the day, which affected the gamma/EMG ratio negatively. On the other hand, I felt good afterwards: mood good, energy fine.

So. A good news, bad news day.

The results:

Date Baseline HRV EC HRV Fdbk 1 Fdbk 2 Fdbk 3 Fdbk 4 Fdbk 5 HRV EC
27 Jun 0.83 0.88 0.90 0.90 0.91
4 Jul 0.85 0.90 0.91 0.94 0.898 0.90 0.84
10 Jul 0.85 0.92 0.89 0.86 0.84 0.86 0.83 0.86 0.90
11 Jul 0.95 0.94 0.86 0.88 0.93 0.95 HRVEC
0.98
0.94
17 Jul 0.91 0.97 1.05 1 0.94 0.96 0.97
18 Jul 0.97 0.99 0.97 1.05 0.93 0.94
25 Jul 0.96 1 1.03 1.02 1.01 0.97 1.02
27 Jul 1.08 0.91 0.96 0.88 0.957 0.962
31 Jul 0.97 0.90 0.94 0.99 Revising
Novel 28min
0.91
1 Aug 0.79 1 0.96 0.89 0.93 Write
7min
1.06
0.86

 

Brain Biofeedback

Gamma Brainwave Biofeedback: Performance Appraisal

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Today was a little different from my normal gamma brainwave biofeedback session. We did one neurofeedback screen — the hardest one — after the usual opening HRV ones. But then my trainer removed my temp and heart rate sensors, I opened my novel-in-progress, she started up a screen with music off, and I began revising a chapter while the screen recorded my brainwaves. Took me 28 minutes. At the 10-minute mark, I began fatiguing and told her. It was nothing unusual, I just hadn't realised before it begins so early in the revising process.

My trainer tried to have me deep breathe with eyes closed to recover some energy, but it took me out of the story, and it was difficult enough trying to get into the story and revising with someone sitting next to me.

My trainer told me afterwards that she was trying to distract me by going back and forth into the other room (like mimicking real-world conditions) but I actually found her sitting quietly behind and to the side of me the worst. While I'm trying to decide on a better word (sans my trusty thesaurus or Google), I’m also wondering if she’s reading my stuff, worrying over what’s she thinking about it, and how my stuff sucks. Well, the last is not that unusual. Still, it’s worse when someone — even a non-judgemental someone — is sitting next to you.

The purpose of today’s change of pace was to see how my brain performs while I’m working, that is, writing. Do I tune out? How much power do my gamma brainwaves lose? How well do I breathe? How will I tolerate a different environment with lots of distractions? Those were the questions they wanted answered. I would’ve liked to have seen my heart rate but that’s impossible when I need to type (the heart rate monitor is strapped to the thumb).

My trainer was very pleased with my performance. She had thought I’d quit after five minutes under those conditions. Nope, that's not me. I have a chapter to revise, I revise it, the whole of it. So my tolerance for a disturbing environment is apparently quite high.

Additionally, my alpha and theta brainwaves were not too high or too low. Let’s see if I have this right: if alpha is too high, creativity stays in the mind. Everyone is creative in their heads: the trick is to get it out of the head and onto paper (or the computer screen). To do that, theta has to be down and, I think, alpha not overly high.

My EMG (muscle tension) went up, as expected, as did my gamma naturally but not as much. The ratio of gamma to EMG dropped. That was also expected, but my trainer was surprised at and very happy with the final number because she had thought it would drop more than it did.

The one question I have and am not sure of the answer: how good was my work? Did I revise as well as I would in my writing environment, or am I going to have to revise my revision? I suspect the latter. Bummer.

So now we have a baseline. The question will be that after more biofeedback training, will I perform better, will I be able to translate increased gamma into the real world?

The other thing of note is my ratio is down today during the HRV and neurofeedback screens. Again. I am not happy. I will have to think about why the drop.

The results:

Date Baseline HRV EC HRV Fdbk 1 Fdbk 2 Fdbk 3 Fdbk 4 Fdbk 5 HRV EC
27 Jun 0.83 0.88 0.90 0.90 0.91
4 Jul 0.85 0.90 0.91 0.94 0.898 0.90 0.84
10 Jul 0.85 0.92 0.89 0.86 0.84 0.86 0.83 0.86 0.90
11 Jul 0.95 0.94 0.86 0.88 0.93 0.95 HRVEC
0.98
0.94
17 Jul 0.91 0.97 1.05 1 0.94 0.96 0.97
18 Jul 0.97 0.99 0.97 1.05 0.93 0.94
25 Jul 0.96 1 1.03 1.02 1.01 0.97 1.02
27 Jul 1.08 0.91 0.96 0.88 0.957 0.962
31 Jul 0.97 0.90 0.94 0.99 Revising
Novel 28min
0.91

 

Brain Biofeedback

Gamma Brain Biofeedback: How Do I Do on a “Bad Day”?

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Today was a “bad day” brain biofeedback session. My trainer wanted to see how my brain (and heart) would do on a bad day, that is, a day I don’t come straight from home but after an appointment, walking around, and lots of TTC time. Plus just being out for much of the day.

Well, my heart was as expected. My heart rate was back in familiar (to me) 120+ beats/minute territory. But surprisingly, to me, training for gamma brought my heart rate down to under 120. My HRV was not completely awful.

My muscle tension was as expected: higher than recently and causing problems during one neurofeedback screen. But I figured out the problem: with posture and breathing taken care of, I had to concentrate more on relaxing my jaw. That’s where tension resides for many of us anyway.

Gamma brainwave power got better once I got my tension down. But overall not as good as it has been. Still, my trainer thought I did well given the circumstances. In fact, even though she averred “no expectations” at the start, she ended the session by saying I did better than she thought I would.

As for me, there was only one thing on my mind: I made it! Oh, and the Olympics are on. Finally! I can tune in and tune out.

The results (because it was a long day for me, my trainer set the screens to three minutes and skipped the last HRV one, thank God):

Date Baseline HRV EC HRV Fdbk 1 Fdbk 2 Fdbk 3 Fdbk 4 Fdbk 5 HRV EC
27 Jun 0.83 0.88 0.90 0.90 0.91
4 Jul 0.85 0.90 0.91 0.94 0.898 0.90 0.84
10 Jul 0.85 0.92 0.89 0.86 0.84 0.86 0.83 0.86 0.90
11 Jul 0.95 0.94 0.86 0.88 0.93 0.95 HRVEC
0.98
0.94
17 Jul 0.91 0.97 1.05 1 0.94 0.96 0.97
18 Jul 0.97 0.99 0.97 1.05 0.93 0.94
25 Jul 0.96 1 1.03 1.02 1.01 0.97 1.02
27 Jul 1.08 0.91 0.96 0.88 0.957 0.962

 

Brain Biofeedback

Gamma Brainwave Biofeedback: Chatty Time

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I used to see a psychologist in the first years after my brain injury. For the last half hour of each appointment, I would lie back in a zero gravity chair, a neurofeedback unit similar to my at-home AVE unit, hooked up to me, shades over eyes, headphones over ears. I never knew what brainwaves he was entraining in me.

One day he chose a program that as soon as it was over started me talking. And talking. And talking. I. Could. Not. Shut. Up.

For hours I talked.

And talked.

Given the zombie state I was in at the time, it was a dramatic change. And weird. And disturbing. Eventually, the effect wore off.

It never happened again.

Years later I wondered what brainwave he’d entrained in me to produce that result. I tried different ones with my own at-home AVE unit. But to no avail.

Fast forward to today. I've begun to notice that after my gamma brainwave biofeedback sessions, I get real chatty. I’m usually tired. I may even feel faint or a bit nauseous from the mental effort of increasing my gamma waves. Yet I can't stop talking, even though I know I need to in order to conserve my energy and to get home faster to eat and rest.

Today, I had to stop myself talking. While my mouth was motoring along, my body was objecting mightily. What a strange sensation.

Perhaps that psychologist long ago somehow stimulated gamma waves…

I had a substitute trainer today. The pauses between training screens was shorter (every trainer has their own style), and she built up to four minutes so that last three were four, first three were three-and-a-half minutes. A little easier than doing four minutes at start. The ADD Centre’s current goal for me is to be able to do four minutes consistently and to achieve a ratio of 1.0 or greater in every screen. We worked on that today, and though my ratio dropped with each neurofeedback screen (sigh), I did achieve more +1.0s.

The results:

Date Baseline HRV EC HRV Fdbk 1 Fdbk 2 Fdbk 3 Fdbk 4 Fdbk 5 HRV EC
27 Jun 0.83 0.88 0.90 0.90 0.91
4 Jul 0.85 0.90 0.91 0.94 0.898 0.90 0.84
10 Jul 0.85 0.92 0.89 0.86 0.84 0.86 0.83 0.86 0.90
11 Jul 0.95 0.94 0.86 0.88 0.93 0.95 HRVEC
0.98
0.94
17 Jul 0.91 0.97 1.05 1 0.94 0.96 0.97
18 Jul 0.97 0.99 0.97 1.05 0.93 0.94
25 Jul 0.96 1 1.03 1.02 1.01 0.97 1.02

 

Brain Biofeedback

Gamma Brainwave Biofeedback: First Good HRV Screen

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My last brain biofeedback session may've been a washout, but as I mentioned in my blog post, I achieved a huge milestone, one I had thought impossible: my HRV looks like a real one.

HRV stands for heart rate variability. Basically, as you inhale, your heart rate rises, and as you exhale, your heart rate drops.

My heart rate usually does whatever it wants independent of my breathing. My breathing technique has always looked like what you see in the above chart (the blue waves) and usually close to six breaths per minute. My heart rate (pink waves) has never been in sync. Never. I had to restrain myself from squealing and clapping my hands and jumping up and down when I saw the above.

The other part of HRV, in simple terms, is that the higher your HRV amplitude, especially in the low frequency purple bar in the above chart, the healthier your heart. You can see mine is almost up to 2.5 (it had reached that level earlier in the four minutes of deep breathing).

First time ever.

Usually you need a magnifying glass to see it. The goal the ADD Centre gave me was to get it up to 10. This is the first time I thought that doable.

Brain Biofeedback

Gamma Brainwave Biofeedback: Fatigue Catches Up

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When your brain doesn't want to work, it doesn't want to work. I guess I shouldn't be surprised. First off, we've had several days in a row of brain-draining high heat. And then with brain injury, doing too much has a habit of catching up to you. Just because my brain shows welcome levels of plasticity doesn't mean things will forever improve or that I'll never have fatigue setbacks. It sucks, but there it is.

I did though get my heart rate down to 100 during today's brain biofeedback, get my HRV (heart rate variability) up to 2.5 on the LF (low frequency) bar, the highest I've achieved so far, and had my HRV beginning to look the way it's supposed to, in sync with my breathing. I've never seen that before! Usually my heart ignores my breathing and does its own wonky thing.

Another up side: my trainer set each of the first three screens (from HRV with eyes closed to the first neurofeedback screen) to run for four minutes. That is a lot more than I've done so far.

I also did feel my brain working hard in the first neurofeedback screen (bowling). I paid attention to the pins not just the bowling ball this time, to see if it would increase my gamma brainwave power.

It did.

I got the highest ratio ever too.

But I paid for it with a headache under the CZ electrode, a touch of nausea, and faintness. The latter two are familiar feelings to anyone with a brain injury, especially when improving and during the initial months of cascading injury.

Today, for the first time since I began gamma brainwave biofeedback, I rested before biofeedback and after. It was like my original days of brain biofeedback back in 2005 – 2007. But like when training the body, eventually you need to rest so that improvement can happen.

Date Baseline HRV EC HRV Fdbk 1 Fdbk 2 Fdbk 3 Fdbk 4 Fdbk 5 HRV EC
27 Jun 0.83 0.88 0.90 0.90 0.91
4 Jul 0.85 0.90 0.91 0.94 0.898 0.90 0.84
10 Jul 0.85 0.92 0.89 0.86 0.84 0.86 0.83 0.86 0.90
11 Jul 0.95 0.94 0.86 0.88 0.93 0.95 HRVEC
0.98
0.94
17 Jul 0.91 0.97 1.05 1 0.94 0.96 0.97
18 Jul 0.97 0.99 0.97 1.05 0.93 0.94

 

Brain Biofeedback

Gamma Brainwave Biofeedback: Videos Nix Thinking

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I learnt something new today through experience, not just being told it's so.

It began when during my brain biofeedback, we moved from the bowling neurofeedback screen to one with a logo on it. “What's that?” I asked my brain biofeedback trainer.

“It's a video screen of a snowboarder,” was the reply. She was going to skip it because it wasn't supposed to be on the menu. But since I'd never seen it before, and it looked snazzy and cool to me — way more sophisticated and fun than the usual screens — we thought we'd give it a try. To watch the video of the snowboarder doing his tricks, all I had to do was keep my muscle tension (EMG) down and my gamma brainwaves up and stay focussed.

No prob!

I began. I coughed. We began again.

But… But… What’s going on with my EMG? I’d begun the training hour with fabulously low tension in the warm-up HRV (heart rate variability) screens, yet despite all my attempts to maintain a good posture and to keep my breathing deep and rhythmic, my EMG kept going into the red. Still, I was being drawn into the snowboarder and all his tricks, and I kept the video running fairly easily too. My head didn't even hurt. It was a nice change from the usual animated screens.

I awaited the awesome results.

Oh.

Not awesome.

Sucky.

I discovered why my tension went up, why my focus improved, why this kind of screen is real bad.

My EMG went up for the same reason everyone's does: we naturally get into the action of the snowboarder, moving with him, feeling the adrenalin rush with him. It's on an unconscious level so that even though you can be the most skilled person on the planet at calming yourself, your EMG will still rise.

Hmmm…me no like.

But worse my gamma brainwave to EMG ratio dropped! What happened? I had hardly felt my brain working, it had been so effortless to focus and to run the video with my brain. So shouldn't that mean better results?

Nope, the effortlessness was the problem.

Videos and TV are entertainment. They — not us — increase our focus because they are something we like and enjoy. Since they “do the work,” we do not need to think or use our brain to increase focus. Because part of my brain was able to shut down for a snooze while the rest of it was being entertained, and none of my brain was thinking, my gamma brainwaves were not needed either.

It was like being on a tandem bike with the video doing all the work in front and me hanging out in back, feet up on the struts, going for a ride and enjoying the view.

This is no way to train the brain. No way to exercise it. This is not what I want.

I want my ratio to go up not down. I want my brain to think not to be entertained. I want to increase the production and power of my gamma brainwaves, not turn them off.

The animated graphics screens are boring in contrast to that cool video. They have one look, unlike the video's changing scenes and perspectives that continually grab the attention. Animating the graphics screens takes effort, unlike running the video. Unlike with the video, you must consciously engage. The graphics screens never show anything but the same graphic moving or not moving — no changing scenes, colours, perspectives and no risky action. To get the graphics moving, you must think about it, you must make yourself focus, you must want to.

In contrast to the video, the last neurofeedback screen, the racing sailboats, gave me such a concentration headache underneath the CZ electrode that I badly wanted to rub my head. Unfortunately, the electrode was in the way, and I had the cool down HRV screen with eyes closed (EC) yet to go. But my EMG had gone down, and my gamma waves had powered up again. I was happy.

So no more video games. It’s all bowling, plane, and the dreaded racing sailboats screens from now on.

In other biofeedback news: My trainer increased the training time for one screen to four minutes for the first time. Adding one extra minute taxes the brain (I know, I know, playing a computer game for only three minutes sounds like peanuts, but try doing it with your brain and not your hands — you'll feel it!). It taxes it so much, I was unable to do four minutes the first time I did brain biofeedback in 2005 – 2007 until my second year of training. I couldn't even imagine being able to do it. Yet this time around, I got up to four minutes in only five sessions. Not bad.

And…

I hit the 1.0 mark! Woot! My gamma brainwave and EMG powers were both 1.36μeV during the first neurofeedback screen, for a ratio of 1.0. I also began above 0.90 and didn't dip back at all into the 0.80s, for the first time ever.

This is further remarkable because today was an extremely hot day, breaking temperature records. As soon as I stepped outside, I could feel my heart speed up, and in fact, it was 10 to 15 beats per minute faster than in previous sessions. I was able to get it down to 114 b/m once I cooled down in the air conditioning after about a half hour, but that was still over 10 above the lowest I'd been able to achieve. Heat also makes it harder to think.

“What’s my goal now?” I asked the trainer. “We don’t know,” was her honest reply. Apparently, it all depends upon me and my progress to determine what the ultimate target ratio should be. Talk about being a guinea pig.

But, hey, it's fun!

The results (notice the dip down during the video neurofeedback screen):

Date Baseline HRV EC HRV Fdbk 1 Fdbk 2 Fdbk 3 Fdbk 4 Fdbk 5 HRV EC
27 Jun 0.83 0.88 0.90 0.90 0.91
4 Jul 0.85 0.90 0.91 0.94 0.898 0.90 0.84
10 Jul 0.85 0.92 0.89 0.86 0.84 0.86 0.83 0.86 0.90
11 Jul 0.95 0.94 0.86 0.88 0.93 0.95 HRVEC
0.98
0.94
17 Jul 0.91 0.97 1.05 1 0.94 0.96 0.97

 

Brain Biofeedback

Gamma Brainwave Biofeedback: A Better Day

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Today was much better. My muscle tension (EMG) was way down from yesterday and even down from last week. If it began to bounce back up to the 2.0 mark during one of the biofeedback screens, I’d remind myself to straighten my neck, and for the most part, that worked to drop it closer to 1.5. One would think deep breathing would affect EMG. Not for me. However, it seems to affect the key frequency: the gamma brainwave. The sweet spot for deep breathing having a positive effect on my gamma brainwave output seems to be six breaths per minute or close to it but not lower.

I think the other reason today was better was why I’m starting with two sessions per week in the first place: the kickstarter effect.

Today I didn’t feel like my brain was straining so hard as yesterday although I did have a concentration headache under the CZ electrode during a couple of the screens. I also experienced the relaxing Ahhh effect of my perceptual awareness opening up during the second screen.

Interestingly, I could really see the positive effect of the parasympathetic response on my gamma brainwaves. Deep breathing induces the parasympathetic system to engage (and so balance the sympathetic or fight and flight system), and the HRV screens are all about focussing on the breath. The parasympathetic response seems to be associated with gamma brainwaves and perhaps the GABA neurotransmitter in a way I don’t understand (but does anyone?).

You’ll notice in the results below that the trainer had me do an HRV (heart rate variability) screen with eyes closed before the final biofeedback screen instead of finishing off with HRV. That’s because she wanted to refresh my brain. Eyes closed means a break from all visual information; HRV means centring myself on my breath, on my body in order to take a break and renew my energy levels. It only takes three minutes. She told me to go to my happy place. Not sure I have one, but I did count during inhale and exhale and did focus on the pattern of the music (all the screens have associated music), which was pleasant for me. I’m not sure how well it worked in terms of results below, but I was definitely more focussed right from the start when I did the sailboat racing screen for the second time. The feedback screens today were: bowling, plane, and sailboat racing.

Today, my trainer measured my skin temperature. For some reason the French Canadian company that makes the software only shows the temp in Fahrenheit units! Imagine that, French Canadians using the old, unscientific measurement units of the hated English. Sheesh. Anyway, it was slightly below normal body temperature. And though it went up with deep breathing, it did drop a tad twice right at the end. It would be very nice if brain biofeedback at the gamma brainwave frequency stabilized my thermoregulatory system and allowed me to feel normal, to not feel like I’m burning up all the time.

My heart rate was thankfully lower than yesterday, almost getting down to 100 beats per minute.

As usual, I was tired and sleepy after, although it hit me a little later than yesterday. But I was not hungry! No sudden appetite walloping me in the gut like yesterday. I did eat half a Simply Bar anyway because my neurons had worked hard and must’ve been in need of fuel.

Today’s results, in which I began at my previously-highest achieved result and increased it to almost 1.0 during the second HRV with eyes closed screen:

Date Baseline HRV EC HRV Fdbk 1 Fdbk 2 Fdbk 3 Fdbk 4 Fdbk 5 HRV EC
27 Jun 0.83 0.88 0.90 0.90 0.91
4 Jul 0.85 0.90 0.91 0.94 0.898 0.90 0.84
10 Jul 0.85 0.92 0.89 0.86 0.84 0.86 0.83 0.86 0.90
11 Jul 0.95 0.94 0.86 0.88 0.93 0.95 HRVEC
0.98
0.94