Jun 182015
 

 
Nothing much new has happened during gamma brain biofeedback for awhile. Hence no posts on it. Until today.

Once you’ve been training an area for quite a few sessions, you’re not likely to see dramatic changes anymore in either brainwaves or outwardly in you. You will see previous changes stabilizing. But this week, during about the last thirty seconds of the second screen of training, as I was following the virtual bowling ball down its virtual lane, my vision shifted.

The display on the computer monitor became clearer, more colourful, and further away. My vision has done this before after my scarred eye began to see in tandem with my good eye. But this week . . .

Suddenly, I saw the entire monitor all at once. I saw the entirety of the display and the monitor frame in one visual field. Every part of it.

For me, this just doesn’t happen.

I see the bowling ball, or I see the levels of brainwaves on the left side of the screen, or I see the breathing rate prompt above the bowling ball. But everything — including the frame of the monitor — all at once? No. Wow. Freaky.

I held onto it for the last thirty seconds or so of the brainwave training screen. But I couldn’t replicate it when we did the third and last three-minute screen. That’s OK. It felt like it would have required too much of me to do so anyway. And once a change happens, it’ll happen again and again and then it’ll become part of me and stabilized.

Apparently, most people can see the whole display screen and must learn to narrow their focus down to one part of the screen. People with ADD in particular have to learn how to do that. So that is one way I differ from people with ADD. I hadn’t known that I differed from folks with ADD in that significant aspect until now, especially since I had found brain biofeedback through looking for ADD treatments and had shared their inability to concentrate and easy distractability.

But unlike them, I see in narrow focus.

I suppose that puts me at an advantage when training because that’s one thing I don’t have to learn in order to train my brain. But it does mean I have to deliberately move my focus around — my direct vision if you will — to see the whole of anything in parts then stitch them together in my knowledge but cannot perceptually or visually. I see now how that would be tiring, and why my chest felt lighter as my visual field broadened to encompass the entire monitor.

Since we’re not training high-frequency alpha brainwaves, this is probably not a big picture thing — that ability that allows you to see the whole street you’re walking down or the story unfolding as you read it. It’s more likely a perceptual thing — we are training PZ at the middle top of the back of the head near the occipital lobe (visual cortex) — and also is my brain coming out of a fog.

Still, I have often wondered if gamma is a foundational brainwave that if you enhance will then bring up the high-frequency alpha and thinking beta waves. This could be both my brain continuing to emerge out of a fog and the gamma increase enhancing my high-frequency alpha waves too. Cool.

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