Jan 272015
 

Brain injury can lead to emotions turning off, short circuiting, the frontal lobes not mediating the reptilian brain. PTSD can lead to emotions being blocked. Having the two makes mood and feeling emotions like being on a rudderless ship in an unpredictable gale. So where does gamma brainwave biofeedback fit in?

If brain biofeedback or neurofeedback takes a broken brain and, like a potter does with a shattered vase, glues the pieces back together, albeit with visible cracks, then gamma is the water that smooths the cracks.

Gamma is fragile. It repairs emotions, but enhancing it in a broken brain is tricky.

Those with only trauma apparently feel their wounds being healed, their mood lifted into happiness, whereas I with my injured brain have a more complicated healing journey. I felt that happiness more when doing the biofeedback at CZ than at PZ, but emotions are harder to repair in me, gamma harder to sustain, takes more work to effect the same amount of healing. Plus, to be honest, after awhile you get used to the change in stress and mood after biofeedback and so don’t feel the improvement as dramatically anymore.

Still, although, I am having problems with blocking my emotions, I am much better off with weekly gamma brainwave biofeedback than without. It has helped me unblock, feel, and process my emotions faster and easier than if I had not had it.

I know the effect of not having biofeedback in the gamma range because for the first six months of last year, we switched to regular brain biofeedback, and I felt like I was on that rudderless ship stuck between skyscraper-tall swells in an endless sea.

It’s still not easy now navigating these erratic swells of emotion, but gamma makes it less scary, less stressful, and my neurodoc adjusting his therapeutic methodology has helped me enormously too.

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